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‘Meet girls. Take drugs. Listen to music.’ In Rave, cult German novelist Rainald Goetz takes a headlong dive into nineties techno culture. From the cathartic release on the dance floor to the intense conversations in corners of nightclubs and the after-parties in the light of dawn, this exhilarating, fragmentary novel captures the feeling of debauchery from within. Dazzling and intimate, Rave is an unapologetic embrace of nightlife from an author unafraid to lose himself in the subject of his work.

16,20

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"In Reto Pulfers Sci-Fi Roman Gina gibt es weder ein prä-existentes Innenleben und eine davon unabhängige Außenwelt noch ein kohärentes Subjekt namens ‚Gina‘. Hingegen besteht ihr Inneres aus purem Außen, und darum besteht sie aus vielem.“ – Anselm Franke

16,00

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Belonging and estrangement intertwine in these four lyrical short stories from the the author of Invisible Man.

'Though their house was new, the wall had been there a long time.' In these two stories, which have never before been translated into English, Tsushima shows how memories, dreams and fleeting images describe the borders of our lives.

2,00

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The Witch is dead. After a group of children playing near the irrigation canals discover her decomposing corpse, the village of La Matosa is rife with rumours about how and why this murder occurred. As the novel unfolds in a dazzling linguistic torrent, Fernanda Melchor paints a moving portrait of lives governed by poverty and violence, machismo and misogyny, superstition and prejudice. Written with an infernal lyricism that is as affecting as it is enthralling, Hurricane Season, Melchor’s first novel to appear in English, is a formidable portrait of Mexico and its demons, brilliantly translated by Sophie Hughes.

14,00

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Minor Detail begins during the summer of 1949, one year after the war that the Palestinians mourn as the Nakba – the catastrophe that led to the displacement and expulsion of more than 700,000 people – and the Israelis celebrate as the War of Independence. Israeli soldiers capture and rape a young Palestinian woman, and kill and bury her in the sand. Many years later, a woman in Ramallah becomes fascinated to the point of obsession with this ‘minor detail’ of history. A haunting meditation on war, violence and memory, Minor Detail cuts to the heart of the Palestinian experience of dispossession, life under occupation, and the persistent difficulty of piecing together a narrative in the face of ongoing erasure and disempowerment.

12,00

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Flights, a novel about travel in the twenty-first century and human anatomy, is Olga Tokarczuk’s most ambitious to date. It interweaves travel narratives and reflections on travel with an in-depth exploration of the human body, broaching life, death, motion, and migration. From the seventeenth century, we have the story of the Dutch anatomist Philip Verheyen, who dissected and drew pictures of his own amputated leg. From the eighteenth century, we have the story of a North African-born slave turned Austrian courtier stuffed and put on display after his death. In the nineteenth century, we follow Chopin’s heart as it makes the covert journey from Paris to Warsaw. In the present we have the trials of a wife accompanying her much older husband as he teaches a course on a cruise ship in the Greek islands, and the harrowing story of a young husband whose wife and child mysteriously vanish on a holiday on a Croatian island. With her signature grace and insight, Olga Tokarczuk guides the reader beyond the surface layer of modernity and towards the core of the very nature of humankind.

14,00

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By way of word games and schematics, Anna M. Szaflarski searches for the ‘emergent properties’ that materialize between texts. This book compiles the issues from Letters to the Editors: a self-printed black and white bi-weekly journal dedicated to text-based practices, written and distributed by Szaflarski between October 2014 and November 2015. Each issue combined Szaflarski’s texts with contributions from artists, writers, family, friends, librarians, and colleagues, ranging from poetry and fiction to essays and manifestos. As the project progressed the letters came together and the body of LTTE formed: It had arms and legs, perhaps a brain but above all, a heart and a stomach, often aching, rarely satisfied.

12,00

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Was geschieht, wenn das Gleichgewicht aus den Fugen gerät? Dieser Frage widmet sich Matias Faldbakken in seinem neuen Roman. Den Rahmen bildet ein altmodisches Restaurant namens The Hills, dessen Ursprünge bis ins 19. Jahrhundert zurückreichen. Ein Pianist sorgt für ruhige Hintergrundmusik, die Einrichtung ist klassisch, gediegen. Der Leser wird in ein eigenes Universum eingeführt. Chef, Koch, Kellner: Die Hierarchien sind klar verteilt. Es herrscht eine Mischung aus strikten Routinen und hochsensiblen Umgangsformen. All das gerät ins Wanken, als eine unbekannte Frau ins Lokal kommt. Wer ist die Frau? Was will sie? Nicht nur der Kellner, sondern auch die Stammgäste geraten in Aufruhr.

22,00

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An essay with the reach and momentum of a novel, Kate Briggs’s This Little Art is a genre-bending song for the practice of literary translation, offering fresh, fierce and timely thinking on reading, writing and living with the works of others. Taking her own experience of translating Roland Barthes’s lecture notes as a starting point, the author threads various stories together to give us this portrait of translation as a compelling, complex and intensely relational activity. She recounts the story of Helen Lowe-Porter’s translations of Thomas Mann, and their posthumous vilification. She writes about the loving relationship between André Gide and his translator Dorothy Bussy. She recalls how Robinson Crusoe laboriously made a table, for him for the first time, on an undeserted island. With This Little Art, a beautifully layered account of a subjective translating experience, Kate Briggs emerges as a truly remarkable writer: distinctive, wise, frank, funny and utterly original.

13,00

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Die Hexe ist tot, ermordet – aber hat sie’s nicht genau so gewollt? Sprachgewaltig, schmutzig und mit der Sogkraft eines Wirbelsturms schreibt Fernanda Melchor, eine der wichtigsten jungen Stimmen Lateinamerikas, über die viel zu alltägliche Gewalt gegen Frauen. La Matosa, eine gottverlassene Gegend in der mexikanischen Provinz. In der brütenden Hitze bewegt sich eine Gruppe von Kindern durchs Zuckerrohrdickicht. Zwischen Plastiktüten und Schilf stoßen sie auf eine Tote, ihr Gesicht ist zu einer grausig lächelnden Grimasse entstellt: La Bruja, die Hexe, eine von den Dorfbewohnern so gefürchtete wie fasziniert umkreiste Heilerin. Manche sagen, in ihrer schwefligen Küche braue sie Tränke gegen Krankheit und Leid, andere sagen, die Alte treibe es mit dem Teufel. An Mordmotiven fehlt es nicht: Eifersucht, Drogenhandel, Leidenschaften, die besser nicht ruchbar werden – und hat die Hexe nicht doch einen Schatz versteckt? Selbst die Polizei sucht nach dem Geld … »Saison der Wirbelstürme« ist die Chronik dieses unvermeidlichen Todes und zugleich die schwindelerregende Reise ins finstere Herz eines Landes, das bis in den letzten Winkel von Gewalt durchdrungen ist – vor allem gegen Frauen. Fernanda Melchor schafft eine brodelnde Atmosphäre, in der jede Geste der Zärtlichkeit im nächsten Augenblick in Brutalität umschlagen kann, gegen die kein Kraut, kein Zauberspruch mehr hilft.

22,00

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